« LES ROUTES DU MIEL » en pré commande

http://www.editions-hozhoni.com/?p=1737

« Pour un monde plus doux », une exposition de 46 tirages 1 x 1,5 m au Palais des Nations à l’ONU à Genève.

Du 11 au 20 septembre 2013, j’expose une partie de mon travail sur l’apiculture dans le monde au siège de l’ONU à Genève dans la magnifique passerelle vitrée de 66 m entre la bibliothèque et le centre de conférence.

Une vidéo sur la plus grande fête du miel au monde en Chine

Abeilles du monde, un diaporama original en français, anglais, russe et japonais…


Depuis 2004, je témoigne des liens tissés entre les abeilles et les hommes sur les cinq continents.
Mes reportages montrent la diversité et l’enracinement de l’apiculture dans toutes les civilisations du monde. Ces histoires humaines parlent de cultures et de techniques qui risquent de disparaître avec la mondialisation.
Le projet « Abeilles du Monde » met aussi en perspective l’active prédation de l’homme sur le milieu naturel.
Photographe engagé, je cherche à montrer que la disparition des espèces n’est pas une fatalité, mais une question de priorités et de valeurs.
C’est pourquoi je suis heureux du partenariat autour du projet “Abeilles du Monde” avec la Fondation Melvita avec qui nous partageons le même engagement en faveur des abeilles, de l’agriculture biologique et de la préservation des milieux naturels.
Eric Tourneret

Since 2004, I have been bearing witness to the bonds that have been woven between bees and humans on five continents.
My features show the diversity and deep-rootedness of beekeeping in all civilizations in the world. These human stories speak of cultures and techniques that are in danger of disappearing with globalization.
As a committed photographer, I seek to show that the disappearance of the species is not something inevitable, but simply a question of priorities and values.
That’s why I am happy about this partnership with the Melvita Foundation, which shares with me the same commitment to bees, organic farming and the preservation of natural environments.
Eric Tourneret

As cave paintings from the Neolithic era or those found in the Cave of the Spider can show, humankind and the bee have a close alliance.
Nomad-gatherers, bee shepherds or settled beekeepers, they keep alive, over the entire surface of the globe, a mysterious fraternity in which symbols, legends and mutual benefits merrily coexist.
The rampant standardization of the world works at destroying this fascinating ethno-diversity.
With courage and tenacity, Eric Tourneret – the talented “bee photographer” – aims to testify to these threatened centuries-old traditions and at the same time make known the fortunate initiatives that are reintroducing the “daughters of the sun” into the heart of the cities.
Through its commitment, the MELVITA Foundation has made it its mission to stand by this beautiful project of a lifetime…
Bernard CHEVILLIAT
Melvita Founder

https://vimeo.com/37049704
世界の蜂 エリック トゥルヌレ
https://vimeo.com/37030235
Фонд Melvita представляет проект «Пчелы мира». Эрик Турнере

WikiLeaks Says EPA Is A Buzz Kill For Bee Colonies – I just want to share it – Remember when you vote… politics know

December 20, 2010 Global Animal
Dec. 20, 2010 – A memo leaked to a Colorado beekeeper indicates that the EPA was well-aware that the pesticide Clothianidin poses serious risks to honey bees, according to WikiLeaks. Yet the federal agency allowed Bayer to widely use the pesticide on corn, wheat and other staple food products, amounting to a $262 million cash crop for the Fortune 500 pharmaceutical and chemical company.

While the WikiLeaks media frenzy may have been focused on the release of tens of thousands of classified military and U.S. State Department documents, it’s a leaked Environmental Protection Agency document that has conservationists, environmentalists and beekeepers abuzz.

The November 2nd memo, leaked to a Colorado beekeeper, indicates that the EPA was well-aware that the pesticide Clothianidin posed some serious risks to honey bees. There have been concerns about this chemical from as far back as 2003, and it’s already been banned in Germany, France, Italy and Slovenia because of its toxicity. But the EPA chose to sweep all that under the rug to keep the pesticide on the market.

Clothianidin, marketed as “Poncho” by Bayer, is widely used on corn, as well as canola, soy, sugar beets, sunflowers and wheat. As if the $262 million cash crop from last year wasn’t enough, Bayer wants to keep expanding the pesticide’s use. And the company’s original registration was based on some seriously flawed science: they evaluated the wrong crop, with the wrong controls to assess the impact on bees.

This all adds up to some serious questions about the government contributing to Colony Collapse Disorder as they knowingly allowed Bayer to poison bees. And this is about a lot more than honey production … native habitats, and as much as one-third of America’s food supply, rely on the pollination provided by bees.

In light of the leaked memo, the National Honey Bee Advisory Board, American Beekeeping Federation, American Honey Producers Association, Beyond Pesticides, Pesticide Action Network North America, and Center for Biological Diversity sent a letter to the EPA requesting that the agency “take urgent action to stop the use of this toxic chemical.”

The letter goes on to point out that this new information indicates an overuse of the Office of Pesticide Program’s conditional registration program. This bee boondoggle “represents a failure that could and should have been avoided.” As a result, the coalition is calling for an immediate moratorium on these types of registration until the program is evaluated.

There’s still a lot we don’t know about Colony Collapse Disorder and the massive bee die-offs it’s been causing. One thing we do know is that bees are in trouble, and that’s not good news for all the animals (and humans) who rely on the plants these important insects sustain.

Join the call for the EPA to stop the sale of Poncho and conduct a thorough study into the pesticide’s impact on wildlife.

By Stephanie Feldstein
http://animals.change.org/blog/view/wikileaks_uncovers_government_bee_killing_conspiracy

Excerpt from leaked EPA memo:

Clothianidin’s major risk concern is to nontarget insects (that is, honey bees). Clothianidin is a neonicotinoid insecticide that is both persistent and systemic. Acute toxicity studies to honey bees show that clothianidin is highly toxic on both a contact and an oral basis. Although EFED does not conduct RQ based risk assessments on non-target insects, information from standard tests and field studies, as well as incident reports involving other neonicotinoids insecticides (e.g., imidacloprid) suggest the potential for long-term toxic risk to honey bees and other beneficial insects.
http://www.globalanimal.org/2010/12/20/wikileaks-says-epa-is-a-buzz-kill-for-bee-colonies/26984/
En Français: http://www.unaf-apiculture.info/presse/2011_1101_Francesco_Wikileaks_clothiaSD1.pdf

In China to the 10 th April. En Chine jusqu’au 10 avril.

Bonjour,
Je suis en Chine en reportage jusqu’au 10 avril. Mon adresse email est néanmoins relevée deux fois par semaine et mon assistante donnera une réponse aux questions qu’elle peut traiter. En cas de dossier urgent, vous pouvez contacter directement par téléphone Muriel Ecuer au +33 (0)6 68 44 91 69 qui sera à même de prendre en charge vos besoins iconographiques ou lui envoyer un mail: muriel.ecuer@free.fr
Pour la presse, mon agent Thierry Tinacci de Lightmediation peut être contacté au +33 (0)6 61 80 57 21.
Merci
Eric Tourneret

Hello, I will be in China to the 10 th April. My email is read two times a week by my assistant and she will give a answer to commercials inquiries.
It you have a urgent need, you can call Muriel Ecuer : + 33 (0)6 68 44 91 69, she will give a answer to your iconographic search.
Her email: muriel.ecuer@free.fr
For magazine and press, my agent Thierry Tinacci is alway available by phone + 33 6 61 80 57 21 or on the web site : http://www.lightmediation.com/en/
Best regard
Eric Tourneret

Orkney Islands, Beekeepers from the extreme

Karen Scott from the Centre of Rural Economy of the University of Newcastle give a interview on her work in Orkney.
In Orkney islands, beekeeping is alway extreme due to the climate. Without trees, covered by moors and subject to violent winds, the bees have been introduce here by men and can not survive without them. Varroa free, sanctuary of the european Apis Mellofera mellifera, commonly called black been, the Orkney Islands are today a reference in England. The Orkney Beekeepers Association try to protect the islands from the introduction of varroa mite and from the importation of hybrids bees.

Coup de pouce pour la planète

Eric Tourneret parcourt le monde pour rendre hommage aux abeilles.
Vaste chantier !

20 000 espèces répertoriées sur la planète !
S’autorisant toutes les audaces pour capter de manière originale ses frêles modèles, ce photographe hors norme photographie la grâce insoupçonnée de ces insectes. Et ses audaces de composition, l’originalité de ses cadrages réveillent nos yeux. On reste bluffé par le travail de l’artiste !
Qui donc aurait pu imaginer une telle organisation chez les abeilles dans une telle débauche de couleurs ?
Eric Tourneret saisit leur taille fine, leur petite gueule saupoudrée de pollen et, d’un simple clic, immortalise leur appartement-galerie où semble régner un ordre, une organisation quasi militaire.
Eric Tourneret rend hommage à ses apiculteurs qu’ils vivent au Cameroun, en Inde, en France ou ailleurs, à ces hommes ou femmes qui bichonnent ces sentinelles de la biodiversité que l’industrie chimique ne cesse de décimer.

Frantz Vaillant, Rédacteur en Chef de Coup de pouce pour la planète.

http://www.tv5.org/cms/chaine-francophone/Revoir-nos-emissions/Coup-de-pouce-pour-la-planete/Episodes/p-17894-Eric-Tourneret.htm

The amazing stingless bees of the Amazon

The amazing stingless bees of the Amazon from Eric Tourneret on Vimeo.

Amazonian stingless bees, which include many species that play an important role as pollinators and are quite diverse in the Amazon. In Belem, Dr. Giorgio Vertutieri study these bees for the Embrapa.

Cueilleurs de miel au Népal.

La chasse au miel est encore pratiqué dans les vallées reculées du Népal. Le photographe Eric Tourneret fait partager son voyage en un diaporama surprenant.